KGC


Keio University Shonan Fujisawa Campus
Course Summary (Syllabus)


DEVELOPMENT AND THE LOCAL COMMUNITY (Lynn Thiesmeyer

    Semester : 2009 Fall
    Code : 65020 / 2 Credits


1. Objectives/Teaching method

    【科目概要(詳細)】この授業は英語主体であるために以下の外国語での概要を参照。講義、読書、課題、テストは全て英語となります。This course is taught in English for advanced undergraduates and for graduate students. We survey the main problems brought about by economic development in Asia, especially Southeast Asia. We also look at the kinds of solutions that the people living with the development process in these countries are attempting to implement themselves.
    We look at 4 broad issues in resource-poor areas: 1) sustainable livelihoods in the rural ecology; 2) fulfillment or lack of basic needs; 3) gender and development; 4) public health in developing regions.
    Students must already have a high level of proficiency in reading and writing English at an academic level, and have achieved TOEFL 550 or higher.


2. Materials/Reading List

    1.Vandana Shiva, “Miracle Seeds and the Loss of Genetic Diversity.” In Monocultures of the Mind. Zed Books, 1993.
    2.Esteba, Gustavo. “Development.” From The Development Dictionary.
    3.Ranema, Majid. “Poverty.” From The Development Dictionary. Princeton University Press, 1994.
    4.Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development: The Making and Unmaking of the Third World.
    5.Sen, Amartya. Commodities and Capabilities, chapter 3 (“Utility, Desire, Well-being”)
    6.Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom.
    7.Shiva, Vandana. Biodiversity: Social & Ecological Perspectives. Zed Books, 1991.
    8.McCully, Patrick. Silenced Rivers.
    9.Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities, chapter
    10.Chambers, Robert. Whose Reality Counts? Putting the First Last.
    11.Momsen, Janet Henshall. Gender and Development.
    12.Mies, Maria. Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale.
    13.Balakrishnan, Radhika, ed. The Hidden Assembly Line.
    15.World Bank. Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic, part I.


3. SCHEDULE

    #1 Explanation of the Course: Rural Development in S.E. Asia.
    Reading of, and in-class essay on the article by Vandana Shiva, “Miracle Seeds”

    #2 Main Issues in Development
    Esteba, Gustavo. “Development.” From The Development Dictionary.
    Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development.

    #3 History and Theory of Development / Definitions of Poverty
    Ranema, Majid. “Poverty.” From The Development Dictionary.

    #4 Development Planning and Problematic Results: I
    Vandana Shiva, “Miracle Seeds"

    #5 Development Planning and Problematic Results: II
    McCully, Patrick. Silenced Rivers.

    #6 Measurements and Definitions of Poverty: Critiques
    Sen, Amartya. Commodities and Capabilities, chapter 3 (“Utility, Desire, Well-being”)
    Mid-term assignment distributed in class.

    #7 Can Measurements of Poverty Underlie Development Policy?
    Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom, chapter 4, “Poverty as Capability Deprivation”
    Mid-term assignment due at the beginning of class.

    #8 Gender and Development I: Gender and Economic Activity
    Momsen, Janet Henshall. Gender and Development.
    Mies, Maria. Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale.

    #9 Gender and Development II: Low-wage Labour in the International Economy
    Balakrishnan, Radhika, ed. The Hidden Assembly Line.

    #10 Development Policy and “Bad” Development
    Chambers, Robert. Whose Reality Counts?

    #11 Development and Public Health Policy: HIV and Development Regression
    World Bank. Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic, part I.

    #12 Development and its Aims
    Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom, chapter 2: “Ends and Means of Development”.

    #13 Final Test. Required.
    Final Essay Test. Required. In-class.


4. Assignments/Examination/Grad Eval.

    1. The short essay on the first day of class is required. You must attend on the first day and hand in the essay.
    2. During Week 6, the required mid-term essay assignment will be distributed during class. You must hand it in by the beginning of class on Week 7. If you do not submit it, you will automatically fail the course.
    3. Week 13, the final class day, there will be an in-class written test. It is a requirement. You must attend and write the essay.


5. Special Note

    1. Attendance and submission of the first day’s essay is required on the first day of class.
    2. Submission of the mid-term written assignment is required at the beginning of class, Week 7. Failure to submit the essay at this time will result in failing the entire course.
    3. The final test will be held in class on the last day of class, Week 13. Attendance is required.


6. Prerequisit / Related courses

    -


7. Conditions to take this course

    This course is taught in English. The course should have about 100 students or less, so there will be a Selection Process on the first day. It will be based on an essay assignment during the class.


8. Relation with past courses

    -


9. Course URL

    http://(グロ
    璽丱襯ャンパスによるアップされる
    Available
    on
    the
    Global
    Campus
    website)


2009-08-18 16:17:47.80636


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