KGC
[ Japanese ]

Application Guideline for Taking e-Courses
(Spring Semester of Academic Year 2017)


Should you require further information or have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact us by clicking on INQUIRIES.


e-Courses Offered

    DESIGNING LOW-CARBON SOCIETY
    ( Wanglin YAN, Hikaru Kobayashi, Makoto Kato, Naoki Matsuo )
    2 credits
    Wanglin YAN
    Hikaru Kobayashi

    Naoki Matsuo
    You will study fundamental knowledge both in terms of science and policies necessary to understand key issues involved in, and approaches to designing low-carbon societies, including: 1. Scientific understanding of climate change, its impacts, science and policy interface, global greenhouse gas emissions and their future projections based on different socio-economic scenarios. 2. Integration of climate change policies into development in developing countries in Asia, 3. Political processes of building international regime to tackle climate change, current negotiations on post-2012 climate regime and their challenges, 4. Key considerations in designing emissions trading and other important policy instruments, 5. Carbon accounting and carbon management, and 6. Corporate, local and national climate actions.

    penSyllabus

    * This course is conducted in English.

    REGIONAL INFOMATIZATION ( Yoshinori Isagai ) 2 credits
    Yoshinori Isagai The course summary is Japanese only. Please refer to Japanese Page.

    * This course is conducted in Japanese


    POLICY MANAGEMENT (HUMAN SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT)
    ( Vu Le Thao Chi )
    2 credits

    Economic development and/or political development, despite its "promises" of better life, confronts the individuals and communities with the difficult question of how to be part (contribution to? resources for? its beneficiaries or benefactors?) it. Human security since 1994, on the other hand, asks us to pose and question what is so great about "development" in the first place. The purpose of this course is to call attention to this contrast and promote a better framework for the analysis of the "development" as we conventionally understand it.
    1) We are in the area where the existing body of literature is more fragmented than many others. One could say that there are as many theories as there are theorists. So first thing in order is to capture the diversity in the existing body of literature.
    2) Nonetheless, we cannot be happy just going over who said what in the past. We need an analytical perspective, even just for a heuristic purpose. We call attention to the decision-making" process within an individual or of a community of people.
    3) Listening to somebody's talk can be fun, or deadly boring. We want to include the students sitting in the class as someone we should also listen to. We adopt a round-table method of discussion to probe who is getting (or not getting) what. There are going to be a few rounds of this discussion and the theme for each will be determined soon after the semester begins.

    penSyllabus

    * This course is conducted in English.

    DEVELOPMENT AND THE LOCAL COMMUNITY ( Lynn Thiesmeyer ) 2 credits
    Lynn Thiesmeyer In this class we research and discuss issues of livelihood, environmental resources, health, and migration within the ASEAN countries. We focus on the issues that have arisen with economic development. In addition to reading theoretical works on development, we adopt a regional focus on Asia. Within Asia, we focus mainly on Southeast Asia. There is also a practical and micro-level focus on the people and communities in developing regions who are experiencing development themselves. After the mid-term, we explore various strategies for Sustainable Development and participatory development by looking at some current projects in Asia.
    We look at 5 main issues in contemporary development in rural Asia: 1) Unsustainable and Sustainable livelihoods in rural areas 2) Efforts to fulfil Basic Human Needs and Human Security 3) Labor force: gender, migration (both domestic and cross-border), wages 4) Public Health issues and policies 5) Impacts of Climate Change on developing countries and populations
    For a basic grasp of the topics above, students will need to complete a fair amount of reading each week. After reading the assigned materials for each week and participating in the lectures on the reading material, students are expected to participate in questions and discussion. Students should also look at the materials and issues from a multi-faceted point of view. For this purpose they should also research on their own into other relevant primary sources, including books, websites, and current statistical data. Suggestions on these other materials are offered in class.

    penSyllabus

    * This course is conducted in English.

    NETWORK INDUSTRIES ( Takeshi Natsuno Hirotaka Nakajima ) 2 credits
    Takeshi Natsuno
    Hirotaka Nakajima
    The course summary is Japanese only. Please refer to Japanese Page.

    * This course is conducted in Japanese


    ADVANCED RESEARCH (CASE METHODS IN RESEARCH AND EDUCATION) ( Emiko Ban ) 2 credits
    The course summary is Japanese only. Please refer to Japanese Page.

    * This course is conducted in Japanese


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