KGC


Keio University Shonan Fujisawa Campus
Course Summary (Syllabus)


DEVELOPMENT AND THE LOCAL COMMUNITY (Lynn Thiesmeyer

    Semester : 2010 Fall
    Code : 65020 / 2 Credits


1. Objectives/Teaching method

    In this class we research and discuss issues of livelihood, environment, health and gender that have been brought about by economic development. In addition to reading theoretical and historical works on development, we adopt a regional focus on Asia and within Asia, mainly on Southeast Asia. There is a practical and micro-level focus on people and communities in developing regions who are experiencing development themselves. After the mid-term, we explore various strategies for Sustainable Development and participatory development.

    We look at 4 main issues in contemporary development in rural Asia:
    1) Sustainable livelihoods in rural areas
    2) Efforts to fulfil Basic Human Needs and Human Security
    3) Labor force: gender, migration, wages
    4) Public Health issues and policies

    In order to gain a grasp of the topics above, students will need to complete a substantial amount of reading each week.
    After reading the assigned materials for each week and the lectures on the reading material, all students are expected to participate in questions and discussion.
    Students should look at the materials and issues from a multi-faceted point of view. For this purpose they should also research on their own into other relevant primary sources, including books, websites, and current statistical data.


2. Materials/Reading List

    Vandana Shiva, “Miracle Seeds and the Loss of Genetic Diversity.” In Monocultures of the Mind. Zed Books, 1993.
    Esteba, Gustavo. “Development.” From The Development Dictionary.
    Ranema, Majid. “Poverty.” From The Development Dictionary. Princeton University Press, 1994.
    Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development: The Making and Unmaking of the Third World.
    Sen, Amartya. Commodities and Capabilities, chapter 3 (“Utility, Desire, Well-being”)
    Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom.
    Shiva, Vandana. Biodiversity: Social & Ecological Perspectives. Zed Books, 1991.
    McCully, Patrick. Silenced Rivers.
    Chambers, Robert. Whose Reality Counts? Putting the First Last.
    Momsen, Janet Henshall. Gender and Development.
    Mies, Maria. Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale.
    13.Balakrishnan, Radhika, ed. The Hidden Assembly Line.
    14.World Bank. Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic, part I.


3. SCHEDULE

    #1 9.28 Explanation of the Course and Assignments
    In-class essay on the article by Vandana Shiva, “Miracle Seeds”

    #2 10. 5 Main Issues in Development
    Esteba, Gustavo. “Development.” From The Development Dictionary.
    Escobar, Arturo. Encountering Development.

    #3 10.12 History and Theory of Development / Definitions of Poverty
    Ranema, Majid. “Poverty.” From The Development Dictionary.

    #4 10.19 Development Planning and Problematic Results: I
    Vandana Shiva, “Miracle Seeds”

    #5 10. 26 Development Planning and Problematic Results: II
    McCully, Patrick. Silenced Rivers.

    #6 11. 2 Measurements and Definitions of Poverty: Critiques
    Sen, Amartya. Commodities and Capabilities, chapter 3 (“Utility, Desire, Well-being”)

    #7 11.9 Can Measurements of Poverty Underlie Development Policy?
    Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom, chapter 4, “Poverty as Capability Deprivation”
    Mid-term assignment (essay) distributed and explained in class.

    #8 11.16 Gender and Development I: Gender Disparities in Participation in Economic Activity
    Momsen, Janet Henshall. Gender and Development.
    Mies, Maria. Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale.
    Mid-term assignment due at the beginning of class.

    #9 11.30 Gender and Development II: Low-wage Labour in the International Economy
    Balakrishnan, Radhika, ed. The Hidden Assembly Line.

    #10 12.7 Development Policy and “Bad” Development
    Chambers, Robert. Whose Reality Counts?

    #11 12.14 Development and Public Health Policy: HIV and Development Regression
    World Bank. Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities in a Global Epidemic, part I.

    #12 12.21 Development and its Aims
    Sen, Amartya. Development as Freedom, chapter 2: “Ends and Means of Development”.

    #13 1.11 Final Test. Required. In-class.
    Final Essay Test. Required. In-class.


4. Assignments/Examination/Grad Eval.

    1. A brief essay during the first class of Week 1.
    2. The mid-term essay assignment, distributed during the Week 6 class and due at the beginning of class on Week 7.
    3. The final test, taken during the class on the final day of class, Week 13.


5. Special Note

    1. The class is based on attendance. 4 or more absences without excuse will automatically result in failing the course.
    2. Attendance at the first class is required. Submission of the essay distributed during the first class is required.
    3. Submission of the mid-term essay assignment, by the beginning of class on Week 7, is required. Failure to submit the assignment will automatically result in failing the course.
    4. The final test on the final day of class (Week 13) is required. Attendance on that day is required.


6. Prerequisit / Related courses

    -


7. Conditions to take this course

    選抜:The course should have about 100 students or less, so there will be a Selection Process on the first day. It will be based on an essay assignment during the class.学術レベルでの英語の読み書き能力/Ability to read and write English at the university level


8. Relation with past courses

    -


9. Course URL


2010-08-18 16:54:49.663676


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